Tag Archives: oil containment boom

2015 IOSA Newsletter

Please read our most recent newsletter to get updates on Islands Oil Spill Association activities in 2014 and 2015.

2015 IOSA Newsletter PDF1

2015 Oil Spill Response Trainings

On April 18th, 2015, Saturday,

We will hold our first on the water Spill Response Drill at
Stuart Island.  This drill will include deployment of oil containment boom as well as practicing various techniques needed during an oil spill response.

If you are interested in this training, please email IOSA at
iosaoffice@rockisland.com or call the office at 360-468-3441.

Pre-registration is required for this event.

Oil Containment Boom set in a traditional V formation.
Oil Containment Boom set in a traditional V formation.

 

 

September 20, 2014, Drill on the West Side of Orcas Island

 

Sea Goose and Green Heron at Drill on September 21st.
Sea Goose and Green Heron at Drill on September 21st.

On September 20, 2014, IOSA held an oil containment drill on the west side of Orcas Island. One of the first things that was done was to discuss the currents in the area. Current tables are a good first step in looking at how water moves through an area, but we have also found that it is important to incorporate people’s personal knowledge of the currents. Using people’s personal knowledge gives us information about particular quirks of current and tides that is not always found in published information.

Green Heron and the Whale Fish towing oil containment boom in a V configuration.
Green Heron and the Whale Fish towing oil containment boom in a V configuration.

One of the tasks for the drill was to run the rope mop skimmer.   Another important priority was to practice towing boom with two boats working in close coordination.  They needed to maintain a V-shape in the boom while traveling at a slow speed and intercepting “imagined oil/oiled debris” (or in this case, intercepting the nylon-covered hoops used to simulate oil or debris).

As with a spill response, during the drill we needed to adapt quickly to changing circumstances.   As the situation unfolded our best option was to use the rope mop skimmer on the bow of the Sea Goose, positioned at the apex of the V-shaped boom.  Two vessels, the Camp Orkila boat the Whale Fish and one of IOSA’s response vessels, our landing craft the Green Heron, set up to pull 200′ of 20″ oil containment boom behind them.

Rope mop skimmer operates from the Sea Goose.
Rope mop skimmer operates from the Sea Goose.

rope mop skimmer operation box

The rope mop skimmer uses a line of oleophyllic mop material (the yellow “tail” seen in the above photo). Oleophyllic means it adheres to oil and not water.  The rope mop skimmer works best with heavier oil such as bunker fuel (which is a mixture of heavier oils and lighter oils).

The Green Heron and the Whale Fish tow oil containment boom ahead of the Sea Goose.  Yellow nylon-covered hoops float into the boom (simulating oil).
The Green Heron and the Whale Fish tow oil containment boom ahead of the Sea Goose. Yellow nylon-covered hoops float into the boom (simulating oil).

The two vessels towing the boom and the Sea Goose traveled together through the water while the skimming was happening. Responders on the vessel the Little Whaler helped set up the rope mop skimmer, as well as deploying nylon hoops into the water to simulate oil.  Usually we deploy the rope mop skimmer from land, but  practiced using it from a vessel this time.

Rope Mop Skimmer deployed from shore.
Rope Mop Skimmer deployed from shore.

Another aspect of the drill was to set up oil snare on a beach. Oil snare is used to pick up heavier oils (like bunker fuel).  The snare adheres to oil as it reaches the beach, the oil accumulates on the snare, and when covered with oil it is removed from the beach.

Oil snare set up on beach.
Oil snare set up on beach.

The line of oil snare was attached to fenceposts and we discussed how to use it. The use of a shoreline attachment plate was also demonstrated. The plate can be used to anchor boom to the beach, especially helpful for shoreline where there are no large boulders or trunks of large fallen trees to tie to.

While out there, one vessel, the Octopii, did a wildlife survey of the area. Numerous seabirds and seals were seen, including a flock of phalaropes. Knowing what seabirds congregate in different areas is important knowledge to have before an oil spill.

Thanks to both West Beach Resort for letting us have temporary use of their dock for a pre-drill briefing and Camp Orkila  for use of the beach for set up of the snare and post-drill briefing for the crew.

Twenty-five people from Lopez, Orcas, San Juan, and Waldron participated in the drill, with two IOSA boats and three responders’ boats. The drill was highly informative and successful.  It was a good exercise for the responders and boat operators, and contributed to our knowledge of the area.

IOSA responds to boat fire at Roche Harbor Marina

July 10 & 11, 2013

Summary of tasks completed:

  • Nineteen IOSA responders worked on site and one dispatcher completed call-outs.
  • Set oil containment boom in accordance with Washington States Geographic Response Plan Strategy (GRP).
  • IOSA oil containment boom was initially set around the burning vessel by the Roche Harbor marina staff, then IOSA responders set boom around an expanded area.  Also a  double layer of boom was placed around the vessel (to help in catching all the oil that escaped from the boat).  Nearby slips were lined by boom (again to keep the oil from escaping into the rest of the Marina).
  • On the second day the boom was reset to allow vessels coming in to Roche Harbor to use nearby slips.  IOSA responders transferred boom downwind for an additional oil collection area.
  • Responders recovered oil and oiled debris from within the boom over two days.
  • A staging area for oiled debris was set up above the dock area.
  • 214 bags of oiled sorbents, 26 bags of oiled debris and seven bags of other items were collected at the staging area and transported off site to be disposed of at a hazardous waste collection site.
  • After the clean-up in the water was completed, the 1900′ of oiled IOSA boom was cleaned.  All equipment and containment boom used was transported back to trailers and staging locations, in order to be ready for use  when needed.

2013_RH_Resp_clean-up